Books

This is probably going to be the easiest for me to answer; as there is one book above all others that pretty much lingers forever in my thoughts:

Dune ~ Frank Herbert.

This book was such an inspiring read that I even managed to draw in my younger brother to all things Paul.

What author has captivated you the most; which book can you never put down?

My Shelfari Bookshelf

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Comments
  1. John Steinbeck…..one of the few authors I can always go back to. Gabriel Garcia Marquez – a genius. I actively search out writers from other cultures (in translation, of course) since I always get a peak through the window into in a new way of seeing the world. Recently I read “Silence” by Shusaku Endo…arresting, it is sitting in my brain.

  2. Tee says:

    Mark, despite ribbing you for all things ‘Dune’, I’ve never actually read the book, perhaps I should. Anyway, some of my favourites:

    Perfume by Patrick Suskind – Why? Because it’s so brilliantly written. Like Suskind’s other books, the language is precise and creates atmosphere beautifully. (The film just killed it).

    Death at Intervals by José Saramago – What happens if death takes a break and people don’t die? Bit quirky but again superbly written.

    Property by Valerie Martin – A view of slavery from the perspective of the slave-owners wife. Interesting look at slavery from a different angle which shows how many victims there really were to this brutal trade.

    My favourites change as I stumble on new interesting reads so it’s hard to say which is my favourite favourite! See a couple of my other recent favourites here: http://www.shelfari.com/posiefox/shelf#firstBook=0&list=1&sort=dateadded

    Dune.

    😉

    • I think I’ve seen something else that touched on the concept of “what would happen if death took a holiday” – and it wasn’t Meet Joe Black.

      Think I may need to add that to my wish list.

    • Tee – you were just scared by the film version of Dune and the fact you aren’t really into sci-fi.

      There is so much more to Dune than mere science fiction: it has elements of theology, politics, mercantile policy, ethical considerations of genetic engineering and slavery all interwoven into an epic.

      The book easily rivals LOTR for scale.

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